Global COVID-19 registry finds strokes associated with COVID-19 are more severe, have worse outcomes and higher mortality

Patients with COVID-19 who have an acute ischemic stroke (AIS) experience more severe strokes, have worse functional outcomes and are more likely to die of stroke than AIS patients who do not have COVID-19. The wide range of complications associated with COVID-19 likely explain the worse outcomes. Continue Reading at ScienceDaily.com Click Here.

COVID-19 can be transmitted in the womb, reports pediatric infectious disease journal

A baby girl in Texas — born prematurely to a mother with COVID-19 — is the strongest evidence to date that intrauterine (in the womb) transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can occur, according to a new report. Continue Reading at ScienceDaily.com Click Here.

Changes in the immune system can promote healthy aging

As we age, the immune system gradually becomes impaired. One aspect of this impairment is chronic inflammation in the elderly, which means that the immune system is constantly active and sends out inflammatory substances. Such chronic inflammation is associated with multiple age-related diseases including arthritis and Alzheimer’s disease, and impaired immune responses to infection. One…

Discovery reveals how plants make cellulose for strength and growth

The discovery unveils the molecular machinery that plants use to weave cellulose chains into cable-like structures called ‘microfibrils.’ Continue Reading at ScienceDaily.com Click Here.

Safer CRISPR gene editing with fewer off-target hits

The CRISPR system is a powerful tool for the targeted editing of genomes, with significant therapeutic potential, but runs the risk of inappropriately editing ”off-target” sites. However, a new study shows that mutating the enzyme at the heart of the CRISPR gene editing system can improve its fidelity. Continue Reading at ScienceDaily.com Click Here.

Scientists urge caution, further assessment of ecological impacts above deep sea mining

A new study argues that deep-sea mining poses significant risks, not only to the area immediately surrounding mining operations but also to the water hundreds to thousands of feet above the seafloor, threatening vast midwater ecosystems. Further, the scientists suggest how these risks could be evaluated more comprehensively to enable society and managers to decide…

Fossil jawbone from Alaska is a rare case of a juvenile Arctic dromaeosaurid dinosaur

A small piece of fossil jawbone from Alaska represents a rare example of juvenile dromaeosaurid dinosaur remains from the Arctic, according to a new study. Continue Reading at ScienceDaily.com Click Here.

Naturally perforated shells one of the earliest adornments in the Middle Paleolithic

Ancient humans deliberately collected perforated shells in order to string them together as beads, according to a new study. Continue Reading at ScienceDaily.com Click Here.

‘Bystander Effect’ not exclusive to humans

A rat is less likely to help a trapped companion if it is with other rats that aren’t helping, according to new research that showed the social psychological theory of the ”bystander effect” in humans is present in these long-tailed rodents. Continue Reading at ScienceDaily.com Click Here.

Making a list of all creatures, great and small

A new article outlines a roadmap for creating, for the first time, an agreed list of all the world’s species, from mammals and birds to plants, fungi and microbes. Continue Reading at ScienceDaily.com Click Here.

Our animal inheritance: Humans perk up their ears, too, when they hear interesting sounds

Many animals move their ears to better focus their attention on a novel sound. That humans also have this capability was not known until now. A research team now has demonstrated that we make minute, unconscious movements of our ears that are directed towards the sound want to focus our attention on. The team discovered…

Desk-based jobs may offer protection against poor cognition in later life

People who work in jobs that require less physical activity – typically office and desk-based jobs – are at a lower risk of subsequent poor cognition than those whose work is more physically active, suggests new research. Continue Reading at ScienceDaily.com Click Here.

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